Ice losses from the Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctic have increased rapidly over the past 20 years, and it now contributes more to global sea level rise than any other glacier on Earth. Because of this, the glacier is the subject of intense research. A team of UK scientists are currently exploring the glacier to better understand how the ice losses are related to environmental change as part of the UK Natural Environment Research Council iSTAR research programme.

Thining Ice:



Three years of measurements from CryoSat-2 show that the Antarctic Ice Sheet is now losing 159 Gigatons of ice each year, enough to raise global sea levels by 0.45 millimetres per year. Colour scale ranges from -1 to +1 metres per year.


David Vaughan conducts a radar survey on Pine Island Glacier. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


The Pisten Bully?s used to drive the iSTAR traverse on Pine Island Glacier are parked up at camp for the night. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


Dramatic clouds at the iSTAR camp on Pine Island Glacier. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


Sparkling snow at the iSTAR camp on Pine Island Glacier. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


The 6 day white out at site 1 on the iSTAR traverse of Pine Island Glacier. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


Sastrugi and mackerel sky over Pine Island Glacier. The iSTAR camp is barely visible in the distance. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


Conducting a radar survey on Pine Island Glacier with mackerel sky overhead. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


David Vaughan driving the DELORES radar on Pine Island Glacier. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


A sun halo formed above the iSTAR camp at midnight. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.


Sun halo at midnight on Pine Island Glacier. Photo credit: Anna Hogg.